Glaxosmithline Pays Out $3Billion Over Avandia

The UK’s largest drugs manufacturer Glaxosmithkline has agreed to pay the US government $3billion to settle 20000 lawsuits. The bulk of the legal action relates to probes by the US authorities into Glaxosmithkline’s marketing of the dangerous diabetes drug Avandia.
 

Dangerous Diabetes Drug Avandia Linked To Strokes And Heart Attacks

 
Avandia linked to heart attacks heart failure and strokes had been one of the UK’s biggest selling diabetes drugs since its approval by the European medicines regulator in 2000. It was subsequently banned in 2010 amid very serious health concerns.
 
Express Solicitors has represented a number of individuals in UK litigation against both Glaxosmithkline and the NHS who prescribed Avandia. Sadly in a number of instances the drug was prescribed up to eight weeks after the European medicines regulator ordered it to be removed from sale putting patients at unnecessary risk.
 

1000 Extra Heart Attacks Per Annum Caused By Avandia

 
To give an idea of the scale of the issue in 2009 (the year before it was banned) Avandia was prescribed more than 1 million times in the UK alone. A leading clinical pharmacologist calculated that every year UK patients could suffer ‘about 1000 extra heart attacks and possibly 600 extra cases of heart failure too as a result of using Avandia’. 
 
As a Clinical Negligence Solicitor I am pleased that Avandia remains banned. Yet the figures above suggest there are still a great number of people in the UK who could be eligible to claim compensation for heart conditions caused by the drug. Here’s hoping the publicity afforded to the US mass litigation will embolden more people in this country to instruct a solicitor to seek compensation on their behalf.
 
If you were prescribed Avandia by your doctor and have since suffered health difficulties please contact us today to discuss your claim free of charge with a specialist Clinical Negligence Solicitor.
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